Beef Stroganoff

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Baby, it’s cold outside! We just blew past those fall-like temps into the frigid winter of Gulf Coast Texas.  For a couple days at least 😉

While our winters may not be as brutal as our Northern friends, or last as long, the chilly outside still calls for warm dinners inside. In our house, that typically means either a slow-cooking something on the stove or a quick, warm, filling dinner before dark falls. This one fits the latter.

This recipe is adapted from one a friend shared with me years ago – back when we were just college babies learning to fend for ourselves. We didn’t add mushrooms and if we had there surely wouldn’t have been good wine to flavor them with! This beef stroganoff is time-tested and one I’ll happily make, good wine in hand and fond memories of friends in mind, for many years to come.

Here’s to you, Becca!

What recipe have you held on to for years?  Tell me about them!


Beef Stroganoff

  • 12 oz egg noodles
  • 6 oz fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • Worcestershire
  • 4 T flour
  • 2 cups beef broth
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • salt & pepper black pepper

Bring a large pot of water to boil.  Salt the water fairly generously and cook the egg noodles until al dente.  Set aside.

Let’s talk mushrooms for a minute:

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To start, mushroom storage.  If you purchase prepackaged mushrooms, leave them in their packaging and place them in the fridge.  If you purchase bulk mushrooms, don’t worry about cleaning them first, just place them in a paper bag and stick them in the fridge.  This allows them to breathe a bit and stay firmer longer – plastic grocery bags can cause them to fade quicker.

To clean your mushrooms, avoid running them under water. Mushrooms retain moisture like a sponge, giving them more will prevent the mushrooms from browning nicely and give more of a chewy texture to them once cooked. Instead, use a damp paper towel and brush off any excess dirt.  Slice or chop them in similar sizes so that they cook up evenly.

Finally, don’t crowd the mushrooms in your pan and wait a bit before salting them.  Give your fungi some room to groove as they cook so that they saute and brown rather than steam.  Salt will bring out the moisture in the mushrooms, which is true for any veggie.  With mushrooms though, you want them to retain the moisture for a bit so that, again, they brown rather than steam. I’m willing to be that those that don’t care for mushrooms have had ones that lean more towards the steamed, flavorless side of cooking.  Let’s avoid that!  Mushrooms are like a sponge, right?  They’ll take on some of whatever flavor you give them but you want to give them a chance to develop their unique nutty, earthy flavors first.

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If you have a mushroom-loving family, you can most certainly start the mushrooms in a larger skillet and once they are beginning to brown, add the ground beef and cook it all together in the same skillet.  Just remember, you want to give the mushrooms a little time to brown up before salting them. I live in a house divided – one of us says they do not like mushrooms.  It’s okay, we can’t all be perfect 😉 I’m willing to go with it on this one though – I kind of like the presentation of having the sauteed mushrooms on top of the stroganoff rather than all mixed together.

Back to the recipe! In a medium skillet, cook the mushrooms in just a touch of olive oil or butter. Once the mushrooms begin to brown and release their liquid, season them with salt and pepper. Reduce the heat and let the mushrooms continue to cook as you move on to the beef. I may be biased… but a splash of hearty red wine never hurts here.  You know the rule though – make sure it’s a wine you would drink as the flavor intensifies as it cooks. Worcestershire sauce is also a nice addition to the earthy veggies.

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Saute the onions, garlic and ground beef in a large skillet over medium heat.  When the meat begins to brown and the veggies soften, season the pan with Worcestershire, salt and pepper to your liking.

If your ground beef was fairly lean, add a tablespoon or so of butter to the pan. Add the flour and stir to absorb the fat and cook the flour a bit. Stir in the beef broth and cook until slightly thickened, about 5-10 minutes.

Stir in the sour cream and check your seasoning, adding salt and pepper as you like. Let the stroganoff simmer until heated all the way through.

Spoon the stroganoff over the egg noodles and top with mushrooms.  Enjoy!

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Full Recipe

Beef Stroganoff

  • 12 oz egg noodles
  • 6 oz fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • Worcestershire
  • 4 T flour
  • 2 cups beef broth
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • salt & pepper black pepper

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Cook egg noodles in boiling water until done; drain.

In a medium skillet, cook mushrooms in just a little olive oil.

Once the mushrooms release their liquid and begin to brown, season with salt and pepper.

Saute the ground beef, garlic and onions in a large skillet over medium heat until the meat begins to brown and the veggies soften.

Season the meat with Worcestershire sauce.

If the beef was fairly lean, add a couple tablespoons butter to the skillet.

Add the flour and stir to absorb the fat and cook the flour.

Stir in beef broth and cook until slightly thickened, about 5-10 minutes.

Stir in the sour cream,  season to taste with salt and pepper.

Continue cooking until sauce is hot all the way through.

Serve sauce over egg noodles and top with mushrooms.

Zucchini Nut Muffins

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Will and I may disagree a little on this one. He heard “zucchini” and immediately said “NO”.  But for a muffin with some squash in it, these are pretty dang tasty.

Back in Weslaco, Texas my mom made these little gems often.  I believe the recipe came from a friend in town and my sister and I love them.  In fact, when Laura made the seven-and-a-half hour move to Baylor University these muffins became part of care packages sent her way.  I remember packing them up and more than once making sure the precious cargo got in the hands of a loving, die-hard Baylor couple from the church that would be making the trek up north.  When I went to Baylor a few years later you best be sure plans were made to send me some as well.

Zucchini Nut Muffins have everything right about them – they are just a little sweet, always moist, have a crunch from the nuts and they freeze well.  One batch makes 24 muffins so they are great grab-and-go breakfast options or make an easy brunch offering.

Let’s go back to our college days for just a few minutes: What’s in your care package?  You can fill mine with Zucchini Nut Muffins any day.


Zucchini Nut Muffins

-This recipe makes 24 muffins-
  • 2 c shredded, unpeeled zucchini*
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 c corn oil
  • 1 T vanilla
  • 2 c flour
  • 2 c sugar
  • 1 T cinnamon
  • 1 ½ tsp baking soda
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp baking powder
  • 1 c chopped nuts (pecans, walnuts)

Preheat your oven to 400.  Grease two muffin tins or line the cups with baking liners.

*When you shred the zucchini be sure to leave the peel on.  Just wash the produce, chop the stem off and then use a grater to shred it up.  To get 2 cups of shredded zucchini you will need roughly one large or 2-3 small veggies.  Be sure you concentrate just as hard as I am 😉

In a large bowl, combine the shredded zucchini, eggs, oil and vanilla.

Why use corn oil?  Corn oil has a slightly higher smoke point than other oils and is essentially flavorless, both which make it nice for baking. If you don’t have corn oil on hand, reach for the vegetable oil for the same end results.

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Add the flour, sugar, cinnamon, baking soda, salt and baking powder.

Add in the nuts and stir until moistened.

It’s completely up to you which nut you use but the most common choices are pecans and walnuts.  More often than not, I’ll go with pecan.  If you have halves on hand, chop them up a bit.  I like to leave some large pieces for texture throughout the muffins so I don’t worry about keeping the sizes of the pieces too even.

Fill the muffin cups about two-thirds full.

Bake for 18 minutes.

Let the muffins sit for a couple minutes in the pan, then move them to a wire rack to cool.

Once cooled, the muffins freeze and reheat very nicely.

What do you think?  Does the squash-in-a-muffin scare you off or are you intrigued?  Mix up a batch and let me know how you like them!


Full Recipe

Zucchini Nut Muffins

  • 2 c shredded, unpeeled zucchini (about 1 large, 2-3 small veggies)
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 c corn oil
  • 1 T vanilla
  • 2 c flour
  • 2 c sugar
  • 1 T cinnamon
  • 1 ½ tsp baking soda
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp baking powder
  • 1 c chopped nuts (pecans, walnuts)

Preheat oven to 400.

Grease muffin tins or line with baking liners.

Combine zucchini, eggs, oil and vanilla.

Add remaining ingredients and stir until moistened.

Fill muffin cups ⅔ full.

Bake 18 minutes.

Let cool on rack.

Yields: 24

Grits and Greens Casserole

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I’m not going to lie… I have categorized this as a side dish but have totally eaten this for my dinner.  Like, last night.  Also, I’ve may have made a pot of greens solely for the purpose of putting them in this dish. It’s just so good!

Greens are amazing as leftovers.  The flavors just keep developing.  However, sometimes you need a little pep in that leftover step, right? This casserole is a great option for leftover greens.  It’s pretty simple to put together and bakes into a lovely side for a whole new dinner. I’ve even made this for our Bunco group as it is pretty easy to put together and have ready-to-go for a crowd. If you kept your greens meat-free you can easily use veggie stock in the grits to keep this casserole vegetarian as well.  As a bonus, this dish freezes well and travels nicely for potlucks, housewarmings and the like.

What are some of your favorite “reuse recipes”?


Grits and Greens Casserole

  • 1-2 c cooked greens, drained from the pot liquor
  • 1 cup uncooked instant yellow grits
  • 4 cups vegetable/chicken stock
  • Kosher salt and coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 shallots, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 2 cups grated white melting cheese, such as Gouda or mozzarella
  • 3 large eggs, beaten

Preheat the oven to 350.

In a medium pot, bring the chicken or veggie stock up to a boil.  Whisk the grits in slowly so that they do not clump.  Full disclosure:  I’ve not listened to my own advice here and managed to get some gritty clumps.  Don’t you just love an immersion blender in these moments though? 😉

Stir the grits until thickened and season with salt and pepper.

Pour the grits into a large bowl and set aside.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat.  Add the shallots and garlic and saute until tender, about 3-4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

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Add the cooked greens and saute to remove any excess water, about 2-3 minutes.

To the cooked grits, stir in the heavy cream, sour cream, greens and half of the cheese.

At this point, before adding the eggs, taste the mixture and adjust the seasoning as you like.  This is a great point for a few shakes of Tabasco if you’re into that 🙂

Stir in the beaten eggs.  If your grits mixture is still fairly warm, be sure to stir them up quickly so that you don’t end up scrambling the eggs before they are incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a baking dish.

Top with the remaining cheese and bake until the center is just set and the top is golden brown, 40-45 minutes.

Let the casserole rest a few minutes before serving.

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Mmm… make this soon!  You’ll thank me!


Full Recipe

Grits and Greens Casserole

  • 1-2 c cooked greens, drained from the pot liquor
  • 1 cup uncooked instant yellow grits
  • 4 cups vegetable/chicken stock
  • Kosher salt and coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 shallots, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 2 cups grated white melting cheese, such as Gouda or mozzarella
  • 3 large eggs, beaten

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Bring stock up to a boil; whisk in grits slowly so they do not clump.

Stir until thickened; season with s&p.

Remove from heat.

Heat the EVOO in a skillet over medium heat.

Add the shallots and garlic and saute until tender, about 3-4 minutes.

Add the cooked greens. Saute to remove excess water, 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat.

Place the cooked grits in a large bowl.

Stir in the heavy cream, greens, sour cream and half of the cheese.

Taste and adjust the seasoning as needed.

Stir in the eggs and pour into a baking dish.

Top with the remaining cheese and bake until the center is just set and the top is golden brown, 40 to 45 minutes.

Let rest a few minutes before serving.

Greens

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My appreciation for greens has definitely developed over time.  I didn’t really grow up eating them down in South Texas, I’m talking wayyyy South Texas, and surely didn’t know how to cook them.  After a couple… interesting attempts in cooking greens (ask my sister about her misadventure with red pepper sometime!) and finding a couple places that I now must always order them (looking at you Max’s Wine Dive) I have created a recipe that works for me and Will.

You caught that, right?  This recipe is what works for us.  Greens aren’t very “technical” but more of a process that you feel out until you find what you like.  We prefer a tangy, spicy batch of greens so there is quite a bit of vinegar and some dried peppers here.  When it’s all said and done there is typically a shot of Tabasco or pepper sauce shaken over the top of the bowl.  You can also play with the fat base by swapping out the bacon for pancetta, ham hock, leftover turkey legs from Thanksgiving dinner, or skipping it all together for a vegetarian option (in which case you would sub the chicken stock for veggie stock as well).

So how do you like your greens? Let me know what tricks you have when cooking them or the places you like to order greens.


Greens

  • 1-2 bunches of any green – collard, mustard, turnip
  • 3-4 strips bacon, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • chicken stock, up to 1 quart
  • 2-3 T apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 T Worcestershire sauce
  • red pepper flakes
  • 2-3 dried peppers, such as chile de arbol
  • 1-2 T sugar

Rinse the greens well, as they are often pretty gritty.  An easy way to do this is to simply fill your kitchen sink with cool water, chop off the very base of the greens to separate the individual leaves, then submerge the leaves into the water. The grit will fall to the bottom of the sink while your clean leaves stay at the top.

A quick note on the greens: any green will work.  For this recipe, I found both mustard (picture on the left) and collards (pictured on the right) that looked good, so I used a bunch of both!

Leave your knife tucked away for now and just tear off the leafy greens from the stems, trimming the leaves into strips and leaving some small stems.  The easiest way I have found is to fold the leaf in half over the stem and rip from the base of the leaf up towards the top.  Once the whole leaf is removed from the stem I just shred the leaf up a bit. Will’s not a fan of the stems, but I like a few so as I tear I may leave a few of the thinner stems in the mix.  As the greens cook, the stems leave a little “bite” to the dish.

Give the greens another rinse in cool water just for good measure then set them aside to dry a bit as you proceed.

In a large, heavy pot saute the bacon. Or the pancetta.  Or brown up the ham hock/turkey leg a bit, letting some of the meat fall off into the pot.  If you are skipping the meat on this one, drizzle some olive oil around the pot to get your veggies started sauteing.  Once your fat of choice starts browning, toss in the onions and garlic and season with black pepper (add salt if not using meat).  Saute until the veggies are tender.

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Working with a handful at a time, add the greens to the pot.  They will start to release water and shrink up as they cook down.  Stir and add more handfuls until all the greens are in the pot.

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Cover the greens with chicken/vegetable stock.  Depending on how many bunches of greens you started with this may take up to a quart of stock. Add a healthy splash of apple cider vinegar.  I also like to add a tablespoon or so of Worcestershire sauce here for a little depth of flavor and color. Season with salt and pepper and add your heat – red pepper flakes and/or dried peppers.  I like both.  I add about a teaspoon of red pepper flakes and 2-3 dried chile de arbol.  Play around with the heat, but remember 1) that we like spicier greens and 2) that the spice will develop as the greens cook so you may want to start on the lighter side and add as you go.

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Add 1-2 tablespoons of white sugar.  This will help to balance some of the bitterness of the greens.

The stock is now developing into what is called pot liquor (or sometimes spelled pot likker).  Bring the pot liquor up to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer and put a lid on the pot.

Simmer for an hour or two, tasting the pot liquor as it cooks, adjusting the seasoning and vinegar/heat levels to your liking and checking the tenderness of the greens.

The greens can continue to cook as long as you like until they reach your desired tenderness.  On average, I typically cook them for a couple of hours.

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What do you like about greens?  Are you a tangy or a spicy greens lover?  What do you do with your leftover greens? Leave me a comment with your opinions – and stay tuned for a great greens leftover recipe!


Full Recipe

Greens

  • 1-2 bunches of any green – collard, mustard, turnip
  • 3-4 strips bacon, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • chicken stock, up to 1 quart
  • 2-3 T apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 T Worcestershire sauce
  • red pepper flakes
  • 2-3 dried peppers, such as chile de arbol
  • 1-2 T sugar

Rinse the greens well, often they are pretty gritty.

Tear the leafy parts off the stems, trimming into strips and leaving some small stems.

Set the greens aside and let them dry a bit.

In a large, heavy pot saute the bacon.

When the bacon starts getting some color, toss in the onions & garlic.

Saute until the veggies are tender.

Working a handful or two at a time, add the greens to the pot, they will start to release water and cook down.

Stir and add more handfuls until all greens are in the pot.

Cover the greens with chicken stock.  Depending on how many bunches you started with this may take up to a quart.  

Add a healthy splash (a couple tablespoons) of apple cider vinegar and/or Worcestershire.  

Add salt & pepper, red pepper flakes and dried peppers to your taste.  *Keep in mind that the spice will develop as it simmers, so you may want to go light on the heat at first.

Add 1-2 T sugar to balance the bitterness of the greens.

Let the stock, aka pot liquor, come up to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer and put a lid on the pot.  

Simmer for about an hour or two, tasting the pot liquor as it cooks and adjusting seasoning to your preference.

The greens can continue to cook until they are as tender as you like them.